Checking your state of health and why it remains important.

Health Assessment
Staying healthy can delay the onset of chronic disease

HEALTH ASSESSMENT. 

Why it is important and what to expect.

Before embarking on any exercise program it is paramount that you undertake a health assessment whether you are on medication or not.In the world of personal training we are governed by a code of practice and have a “duty of care” to our clients in order to make sure you are safe and as free from risk as possibly.

 The health assessment follows the initial consultation

 What is a health assessment and what does it report?

A health assessment is a measurement of approx 10-12 key indicators of your personal state of health.

They range from blood pressure readings to a variety of tests including body fat measurements, flexibility just to name a few.

The benefit to you is that a health assessment can provide key information and can detect health issues that may prevent the onset of chronic disease such as a stroke.

So, if you are thinking of engaging with a personal trainer this is what you need to know from the health assessment before you start an exercise program.

  •  Blood pressure test

Normal blood pressure for young people 120mmHg/80mmHg and changes with age to approx 140mmHg/90mmHg any higher than that there needs to be referral to the GP

It’s a known fact that exercise raises blood pressure and is linked to stroke. A responsible trainer will never compromise neither you nor them, but will insist on a health check before prescribing or embarking on any exercise program.

  • Peak flow measurement ( tests lung capacity )

This involves blowing thru a tube for a reading three times and averaging for the score and again if the lung capacity is too low exercise may be impaired.

  •  Waist and hip ratio.

Measures waist and hips circumference. Too much weight around the waist can lead to health problems.

  •  Height & weight

Body Mass Index (BMI) is the relationship between weight and height that is often associated with health risks.

Note

Some sports specific individuals who have a higher ratio of muscle to fat such as Rugby players have a tendency to fall into the obese category of Body Mass Index scoring when being tested.

  •  Stretch assessment.(tests lower back and hamstring flexibility)

Hamstring flexibility or the lack of it, can affect one’s exercise capacity due to their short length so problems may arise with cardiovascular training. Training adaptations are required.

  • Core strength assessment.(tests the strength of the deeper core muscles which aids postural strength)

The core area is the area of the body which runs from the shoulders to the hips.

  •  Body fat & hydration assessment ( non invasive testing and immediate reporting)
  •  Full range sit up assessment ( if appropriate)

This assessment tests superficial stomach muscles “the one’s you can see- hopefully”

This test maybe inappropriate for some clients, especially those with reduced flexibility, back complaints or have hernia.

  •  Press up assessment ( if appropriate)

This assessment tests the strength of a variety of muscles in your upper body  and core.

  •  Back  Mobility Assessment ( required for mobility and CV, Cardio vascular training).

 (If appropriate) means that if the trainer believes the test is going to impair the training the test can be bought in at a later date once you have acquired the skills for that test. However, much does depend on what you are trying to achieve from the program. The trainer will make a decision. The results of the assessment will give you a base line in terms of a starting place at that given time and date.

Remember, that without testing or measuring you will never know how much you are improving or what is changing in relation to body composition and your own personal health.

Our assessment will show you just that!

 Exercise prescription also available on request and please don’t be offended if I send you to your GP for further testing should the results dictate.

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